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Signs of Teething in Breastfed Babies: A Complete Guide!

Signs of Teething in Breastfed Babies: A Complete Guide!

Teething is a process that starts around 6 months of age when babies’ first teeth typically begin to erupt. The major signs of teething in breastfed babies are:

  1. Turning away from breast
  2. Biting on nipple while feeding
  3. Excessive drooling
  4. Chewing on everything
  5. Increased saliva production
  6. Irritability and crankiness
  7. Loss of appetite
  8. Softening or breaking of stools
  9. Fever
  10. Diarrhea
  11. Rash on the cheeks, chin, or chest
  12. Rubbing or pulling on the ears
  13. Chapped lips
  14. Swelling and tenderness of the gums
  15. Sleep disturbance

In this article, we’ll discuss the different teething signs in breastfed babies along with the tips to alleviate the pain as much as is possible!

What are the teething signs in breastfed babies

Teething is a process that all babies go through as their primary teeth start to come in. Many parents worry about when their child will start teething, and whether or not they’ll be able to tell. For breastfed babies, some signs of teething are similar to those of bottle-fed babies. However, some signs are exclusive to breastfed babies. The teething symptoms of the baby teeth are all as under:

1. Turning away from breast

When a baby is teething, they may turn away from the breast and refuse to nurse. This can be frustrating for both the baby and the parent, but it’s important to remember that teething is a natural process that all babies go through. There are a few reasons why teething may cause a baby to refuse the breast and why teething affect breastfeeding.

  • First, a baby’s teething pain is high, and the act of nursing can irritate the gums.
  • Second, teething can cause drooling, which can make it difficult for the baby to latch on to the nipple.
  • Finally, teething can cause a baby to be fussy and uncomfortable, making it hard for them to focus on nursing.

2. Biting on nipple when feeding

Biting on a mother’s nipple during breastfeeding is common teething babies. The act of biting releases endorphins in the baby’s brain, which helps to ease teething pain. In addition, the pressure of the baby bites can provide relief from sore gums in baby’s mouth. However, biting can also be a sign of hunger, so it is important for mothers to pay attention to their baby’s cues.

3. Excessive drooling

When a baby is teething, it may drool more than usual. This is because the act of teething can cause irritation in the gums, which leads to increased saliva production. Drooling is also more likely when a baby is teething because they tend to put their hands in their mouth more often, which gives the saliva an opportunity to escape. While excessive drooling is not harmful, it can be messy and uncomfortable for both the baby and their caregivers.

4. Chewing on everything

If you have a baby, you may have noticed that they have started to chew on objects – and maybe even their fingers. This is often a sign that they are teething. When babies are teething, they may experience discomfort in their gums as their teeth start to come through. This can make them want to gnaw on objects – or anything else they can get their hands on! – in an attempt to relieve the pain.

signs of teething in breastfed babies
Biting fingers let babies feel comfort while teething!

While it’s normal for babies to want to chew on things when they’re teething, it’s important to ensure that they only have access to safe objects.

5. Increased saliva production

It’s common for babies to drool more when they’re teething. The increased saliva production is the result of the baby’s body preparing for the tooth to erupt by softening the tissue and bone around the tooth. The saliva helps to lubricate the gums and provides relief from the discomfort of teething.

However, saliva production can also be increased in response to other stimuli, such as eating or drinking. If you notice that your baby is producing more saliva than usual, it is important to observe other signs of teething, such as gum soreness or chewing on objects. If your baby is experiencing these other symptoms, then increased saliva production is likely due to teething.

6. Irritability and crankiness

When a baby starts to teeth, it’s not uncommon for them to become irritated and cranky. This is because the process of cutting teeth can be quite painful. If your baby is suddenly feeling irritated and cranky, it might be a sign that they are teething. When babies start to teeth, they often become more fussy as their gums feel sore.

signs of teething in breastfed babies
Crankiness might be because of teething!

7. Loss of appetite

When a baby starts to teeth, some parents might notice a loss of appetite. It’s very common for a baby to lose his/her appetite when cutting teeth. The process of teething can be painful for some babies. As a result, they may not want to eat as much as usual. Many parents worry that their child isn’t eating enough, but as long as they are still gaining weight and producing wet diapers, there’s no cause for alarm

8. Softening, color changing, or breaking of stool

Teething can affect the stool of breastfed babies in a few ways.

  • First, the stool may soften as a result of the increased drooling that often accompanies teething. All that extra saliva can break down the stool, making it softer.
  • Additionally, as teeth start to break through the gums, they can irritate the lining of the intestines. This irritation can lead to changes in stool color. It appears darker or greener than usual.
  • Finally, the stool may break more easily, leading to more frequent diaper changes.

However, it is important to note that these changes are typically temporary and should not last for more than a few days.

9. Fever

When a baby starts to teeth, their gums can become inflamed and sore. This can lead to fever, as the body’s inflammatory response to the teething process causes a temperature rise. In most cases, the fever associated with teething is mild and does not require any treatment. However, it is important to monitor your child’s temperature closely.

10. Diarrhea

Diarrhea is also a common sign of teething in breastfed babies. Breastfed babies may experience diarrhea when they are teething. This is because the act of teething can cause a build-up of saliva in their mouths, which can then be ingested when they breastfeed. The increased amount of saliva can cause breastfed babies to have loose stools.

However, diarrhea caused by teething should only last for a few days and is not harmful to breastfed babies. If your breastfed baby has diarrhea, make sure to give them plenty of fluids and monitor their stool output.

11. Rash on the cheeks, chin, or chest

Any parent of a teething baby knows the challenges that come with this stage of development. In addition to the pain and discomfort that can come with new teeth, many babies also develop rashes on their chin, chest, and cheeks. While these rashes are usually harmless, they can be quite irritating for both baby and parent.

12. Rubbing or pulling on the ears

Many parents have noticed that their breastfed babies often rub or pull on their ears when they are teething. While this may be due to the fact that the ears are a convenient target for little hands, there is also a more likely explanation. The act of suckling provides pressure and relief from discomfort in the gums and teeth, but when the baby is not nursing, this relief is no longer available.

When baby rubs or pulls on their ears, they are likely trying to recreate the feeling of nursing in an attempt to soothe their aching gums. So, if you notice your baby rubbing or pulling on their ears during a growth spurt or teething episode, it is probably just their way of finding relief.

13. Chapped lips

Chapped lips are a common issue for breastfed babies. When a baby’s lips become dry and chapped, it can make it difficult and painful for them to breastfeed. There are a few possible causes of chapped lips in breastfed babies. One is teething. When babies are teething, they often drool more than usual, which can lead to dry lips.

14. Swelling and tenderness of the gums

When a baby is teething, it’s common for their gums to become swollen and tender. The gums may also appear red and inflamed. This is caused by the pressure of the new tooth pushing against the gums. The gums may be sore and sensitive to touch. babies may also drool more than usual during this time.

15. Sleep disturbance

Most babies start teething around 6 months old. For some, this process is relatively easy and causes no more than a little extra drooling and chewing. However, for others, teething can be quite painful, resulting in sleep disturbance. Babies who are teething may wake up multiple times during the night, as the pain of new teeth breaking through the gums can be quite severe.

In addition, they may have difficulty falling asleep in the first place, as the discomfort of teething can make it hard to relax. Parents of teething babies often find themselves sleep-deprived as well, as they may need to get up several times during the night to comfort their child.

What are some helpful tips for making life easier during teething

Any parent of a teething baby knows that the experience can be trying for both the child and the adults in their life. The good news is that there are some things you can do to help make the process a little bit easier.

  • First, it’s important to keep your baby’s gums clean. A soft, wet, and cold washcloth can be used to gently wipe away any drool or food particles.
  • You can also use teething rings or teething toys to help soothe your baby’s gums. Just be sure to choose one that is made of safe, non-toxic materials.
  • Also, try to keep the baby’s head elevated during sleep, as this can help to reduce swelling and pain.
  • Finally, it’s important to stay patient and understanding during this difficult time. Your baby is going through a lot of changes, and they will need your love and support more than ever. With a little patience and understanding, you can help your baby through this tough time.

Conclusion!

So if your baby is exhibiting any of these signs, it might be time to start thinking about teething. Of course, always check with your pediatrician if you have any concerns, but hopefully, this article has armed you with the knowledge you need to help soothe your little one during this tricky process.

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About The Author

Affaf Amjad

Having an MPhil in Applied psychology and being a mother of three kids, I have always tried to try and test different psychological interventions and approaches in the day-to-day routine of my kids. Sharing my results and effective strategies with parents around the globe is the my main aim as a writer.

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